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10 quick diet tips to help you stay energetic and healthy. 
Boost your energy levels and keep your moods on an even keel with these quick everyday tips for your mind, body and spirit.

 


1. Take baby steps.

If you’re trying to make healthful changes to your diet, keep in mind that even small changes will improve your health and feelings of well-being. Small changes are easier to make and stick with. Keep track of your food intake by writing down what you eat and drink every day and use this record to help you recognize what you need more or less of.

2. Have a healthful treat.

Trying to up your calcium intake? Order a latte or cappuccino made with skim milk as an alternative to black coffee. Keep in mind that caffeine can interfere with calcium absorption, but consuming the plentiful amount of steamed milk typically added to these tasty beverages will offset this effect. 

3. Sip smart.

A moderate amount of alcohol (two drinks a day for men, one for women) may help you unwind and may even be good for your health; be mindful that alcohol has calories, however. A 12-ounce beer contains 150 calories, 5 ounces of wine has 100 and 1 ½ ounces of hard liquor has 100. 

4. Eat more fruit.

Your local supermarket’s produce section may lack substance in the winter, but don’t let that discourage you from getting in your daily servings. When the fresh pickings are slim, opt for convenient, packable dried fruit like mangoes, apricots or plums. While dried fruits typically contain more calories than their fresh counterparts, they’re still a great way to provide your body with the same healthful substances (like fiber, vitamin C and potassium) as a piece of fresh fruit.

5. Get more fiber.

To boost the amount of whole grains you eat, try simple tricks like stuffing brown rice in green peppers or tomatoes before baking. And next time you make macaroni and cheese, substitute fiber-rich whole-wheat macaroni for an added boost.

6. Cereal versatility.

To increase your whole-grain intake, it helps to find clever uses for otherwise plain whole-grain cereals. Substitute unsweetened whole-grain cereal for croutons in your lunchtime salad; use rolled oats as “breading” for staples like baked chicken or fish. 

7. Eat more whole grains.

To increase your whole-grain intake, it helps to find clever uses for otherwise plain whole-grain cereals. Substitute unsweetened whole-grain cereal for croutons in your lunchtime salad; use rolled oats as “breading” for staples like baked chicken or fish.

8. Eat fruit for dinner.

Dinner may not typically be known as a fruit-heavy meal, but that shouldn’t stop you from experimenting with these sweet additions. Try adding drained mandarin oranges to a green salad with refreshing cucumber, or toss grapes, pomegranate seeds or raspberries into the mix. Don’t just stick to salad, however – pineapple is a tasty addition to barbecued kebabs, and chicken pairs well with the sweet flavors of mangoes or apricots. For dessert, bake apples with a drizzle of honey and a pinch of cinnamon.

9. Eat beans for protein.

To vary your protein sources, eat more beans. Whip up a batch of chili with kidney or pinto beans; make a split pea, lentil, minestrone or white bean soup; try black bean enchiladas; or put hummus (chickpea spread) in a pita. Make beans or peas part of a meal often. 

10. Eat for restful sleep.

If a good night’s sleep is what you crave, there may be a food combination to help. Specialists recommend a pre-slumber snack that’s rich in carbohydrates and contains a bit of protein; this combination is said to increase the tryptophan levels in the brain, causing you to sleep more soundly. Try low-fat yogurt with a sprinkle of granola, a small bowl of oatmeal or a sliced apple with a bit of peanut butter.

From www.eatingwell.com with permission.