Prevent Cancer Foundation Blog

No Smoking

Reduce your risk: Lung Cancer Awareness Month

Posted by Lisa Berry on November 3rd, 2014 | No Comments »
no smoking sign

(PHOTO LICENSE) During my sophomore year of college, I watched the ease of cigarette addiction. My hallmate, Jason, started smoking. It was only occasional at first. He would bum a cigarette at a party now and then. Then it was “only when he drank” (which, in college, was easily three days a week). His smoking slowly increased until he was smoking a pack a day. He tried to quit during finals week, but the stress of exams ...

2013 GLCC lung cancer survey gauges symptom awareness, smoking prevalence

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on November 21st, 2013 | 2 Comments »
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According to a recent survey investigating awareness of lung cancer symptoms and smoking prevalence, over 70% of surveyed Americans could name symptoms of lung cancer, the leading cancer killer in the U.S. for both men and women. The survey also found that overall, 18% of people were current smokers while 56% had never smoked regularly. Among the other notable findings were that American women are more likely to say that they have never smoked than ...

Study shows that teen cigarette use drops to lowest point recorded

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on August 5th, 2013 | No Comments »
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A newly released report shows that cigarette smoking has dropped to its lowest point ever among eighth-graders and high school sophomores and seniors. Only 5% of high school sophomores had claimed to smoke in the last 30 days, compared to 18% when the survey was conducted in the 1990s. U.S. children are also exposed to less second-hand smoke, according to the survey. These decreases are attributed to tobacco prevention programs, tobacco taxes and laws restricting ...

Smoking cessation for cancer patients: A complicated picture

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on December 4th, 2012 | No Comments »
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Trying to figure out why most cancer patients continue smoking after being diagnosed is a very serious and complex issue. Approximately 50 to 83 percent of cancer patients continue to smoke after a cancer diagnosis, while relapse rates for those who do quit are as high as 85 percent. Cancer patients who continue to smoke face decreases in survival and increases in cancer recurrence. Dr. Sonia Duffy, a researcher at the University of Michigan, is ...