Prevent Cancer Foundation Blog

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A Significant Moment in My Life…

Posted by Janet Hudson on August 2nd, 2010 | No Comments »
Kathy Nucifora

I have been proud to work with the Prevent Cancer Foundation, and am thankful for the purpose that the experiences have added to my life. Everyone has a few significant moments in their lives that seem to steer us forward along our careers. One such moment for me was after a long, hard, hot day of work at the Bob Dole Health Awareness Booth at the Kansas State Fair. The man (with his wife) was in his ...

White House Announces Implementation of Preventive Services

Posted by Lisa Hughes, Director, Policy & Advocacy on July 15th, 2010 | No Comments »

Yesterday afternoon, First Lady Michelle Obama, Dr. Jill Biden and Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius spoke at George Washington University Hospital to announce the release of new guidelines that will provide free preventive health care services under the Affordable Care Act. For cancer prevention, the new guidelines will mean that most insurance plan can no longer charge copayments, deductibles or coinsurance for a number of preventive services including colorectal cancer, breast cancer screening, ...

2010 Super Colon Tour Wraps Up in the Big Apple

Posted by Suzette Smith, Director, Colorectal Initiatives on June 23rd, 2010 | No Comments »
Kids with Doctor 2 SC New York 2010

The National Super Colon Tour for the Prevent Cancer Foundation's 2010 fiscal year ended with a bang on June 7 at the Jay Monahan Center for Gastrointestinal Health in New York, NY. Even the busiest New Yorkers had to come and take a look see. There were 985 people that toured the exhibit, talked with staff and volunteers and received colorectal cancer prevention and early detection information and giveaways such as buddy bracelets and gift bags. We were even ...

Dr. Richard Wender: The Manly Thing to Do

Posted by Richard Wender, M.D. on June 1st, 2010 | No Comments »
Wender Headshot_300px_72dpi

The strongest predictor of how long a new-born baby is destined to live is not whether they’re born in a city or in a rural area, their nationality, or the color of their skin.  It’s whether they are born male or female.  Men live about 5 fewer years than women. Are men just genetically predisposed to earlier and more death?  Or could a change in behavior result in mitigation of this risk? I refuse to accept ...