Prevent Cancer Foundation Blog

Research

HPV may trigger lung cancer: New study

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on May 21st, 2013 | No Comments »
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Human papillomavirus (HPV), a common virus known to cause cervical and head and neck cancers, may also trigger some cases of lung cancer, according to new preliminary research presented by Fox Chase Cancer Center. When examining tumor tissue samples from lung cancer patients who have never smoked, researchers found six percent of the samples showed signs of HPV infection. Researchers say further study is needed to understand the role HPV plays in some cases of ...

Researcher studies breast cancer screening and whether more is always better

Posted by Sarah Abou-El-Seoud, Coordinator, Research & Programs Administration on May 3rd, 2013 | No Comments »
Sarah AbouElSeoud

In keeping up with the innovative work of the researchers we fund early on in their careers, the Prevent Cancer Foundation is showcasing researcher Dejana Braithwaite, PhD. Dr. Braithwaite is an assistant professor of cancer epidemiology at the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of California, San Francisco. She received a fellowship from the Prevent Cancer Foundation and the American Society of Preventive Oncology in spring 2007 for a study of environmental ...

Heart health = Cancer prevention

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on April 4th, 2013 | No Comments »
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Healthy habits do more than just help protect you and your family from cancer, they can also help prevent other chronic illnesses, such as heart disease. In fact, a recent study suggests heart health may be a vital component in lowering one’s risk for cancer. Researchers tracked over 13,000 people over time who were advised to follow the American Heart Association’s “Life’s Simple 7,” a guide to reducing one’s risk for heart disease, which includes ...

Dramatic increase in anal cancer cases and deaths

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on | No Comments »
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A new study shows the number of people in the U.S. with anal cancer has tripled since the 1970s. Researchers reviewed a collection of data on the most common type of anal cancer cases in the U.S. from 1973 to 2009, and were surprised by the dramatic increase in cases. Although both sexes saw an increase in anal cancer, the rate for men jumped most dramatically - from one in every 100,000 men to three ...