Prevent Cancer Foundation Blog

Research

Night shift workers face greater risk for ovarian cancer

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on April 4th, 2013 | No Comments »
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According to a new study, women who work the night shift are at a greater risk for ovarian cancer. Researchers followed more than 1,100 women with advanced ovarian cancer, nearly 400 with early-stage disease and a comparison group of women without ovarian cancer. Night shift work was associated with an increased risk of advanced ovarian cancer and an increased risk of early-stage cancer for women age 50 and older. This type of work has also ...

Researcher Q & A: Researcher examines how message framing and emotions effect screening decisions

Posted by Sarah Abou-El-Seoud, Programs Coordinator on March 5th, 2013 | No Comments »
Klein, William

William Klein, PhD, is the Associate Director of the Behavioral Research Program at the National Cancer Institute. In the spring of 2007, as an assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Klein received a grant from the Prevent Cancer Foundation. His research looked at how health messages are framed and the role of emotions in medical decision making. For example, are health messages more successful if they focus on the losses from not screening ...

Diet soda may cause diabetes risk

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on February 26th, 2013 | No Comments »
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New research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows a link between the consumption of diet soda and increased risk of Type 2 diabetes. The study tracked the beverage habits of over 66,000 women for over 14 years. The women self-reported their consumption of 100 percent juice, sugar-sweetened drinks and artificially sweetened drinks. By the end of the study period, 1,369 of the women were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Researchers found that on ...

Cancer gaps remain for African Americans

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on | No Comments »
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The latest figures show many improvements have been made in cancer treatments and care for African Americans within the last decade. Since 1990 nearly 200,000 cancer deaths in black Americans have been avoided. But cancer death rates for both African American men and women are still higher than whites. Black women are 16 percent more likely to die from cancer than their white female counterparts. Latest research also shows that between 2005 and 2009, about ...