Prevent Cancer Foundation Blog

Cancer Prevention

HPV Cancers a Concern for Both Men and Women

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on April 23rd, 2012 | No Comments »
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Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the leading cause of cervical cancer, but it also causes oral, anal and penile cancer. According to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) using data collected from 2004-2008, HPV causes 18,000 cancer cases in women and 8,000 cancer cases in men annually. HPV prevention has become a concern for both men and women. Receiving an HPV vaccine before becoming sexually active is the leading way to prevent ...

Researcher Examines Links between Broccoli and Cancer Prevention

Posted by Sarah Abou-El-Seoud, Programs Associate on April 20th, 2012 | No Comments »
Sarah AbouElSeoud

This month we spoke with Barbara Schneider, PhD, who received a grant from the Foundation in spring 2007 to study whether broccoli extract can help prevent gastric (stomach) cancer. We caught up with Dr. Schneider to learn more about her research and how the Foundation’s funding impacted her career. 1.  What led you to the field of gastric cancer research? I used to work in San Antonio, Texas, and I was intrigued by the fact that incidence ...

Prevention Can Cut Cancer Deaths in Half

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on April 9th, 2012 | No Comments »
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Over 500,000 people died from cancer last year, yet over half of them could have been prevented, according to a new review article in Science Translational Medicine. There are multiple ways that some cancers can be prevented. Here are a few: 1 – Don’t smoke. If you do, quit. It may be hard, but more than 75% of lung cancer cases could be avoided in the U.S. if people didn’t smoke. 2 – Ask your healthcare provider ...

U.S. Cancer Rates Decline Result of Better Screening, Focus on Prevention

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on March 29th, 2012 | No Comments »
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A study released Wednesday reports that cancer rates in the U.S. have continued to decline. Since 1999, new cancer cases have been dropping by half a percent each year. Overall, the cancer death rate has declined by 1.5 percent in adults and 1.7 percent in children annually. The findings include almost every cancer case reported in the U.S. through 2008 and come from a report generated by several government agencies and other organizations, including the ...