Prevent Cancer Foundation Blog

cancer risk reduction

Moderate Drinking Linked to Breast Cancer Risk

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on November 6th, 2011 | No Comments »
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A study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has found a correlation between the consumption of alcohol and increased risk of breast cancer. The data showed that even low-levels of drinking (3-6 glasses of wine per week) led to a 15% increase in breast cancer risk and that women who consumed higher levels of alcohol (at least 2 drinks per day) were found to have a 51% increase in breast cancer ...

Sitting for Long Periods of Time Increases Cancer Risk

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on November 4th, 2011 | No Comments »
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Increasing daily physical activity is a great way to lower your cancer risk, but now there is another risk factor that you should know about – being seated for long periods of time is strongly linked to an increased risk for colorectal and breast cancer. "It seems highly likely that the longer you sit, the higher your risk," said Neville Owen, PhD of Australia’s Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute. Dr. Owen presented the research ...

2012 Laurels Awards: Nominations Open!

Posted by Sarah Abou-El-Seoud, Programs Associate on October 28th, 2011 | No Comments »
Sarah AbouElSeoud

In 2012, the Prevent Cancer Foundation, in partnership with the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable, will again recognize and celebrate leaders in cancer prevention from across the country at the tenth annual Cancer Prevention Laurels Luncheon which takes place at the Dialogue for Action conference. The Laurel was chosen because it is an ancient Roman symbol of tribute, honor, victory, merit and reward. To view a list of all past awardees, click here. Awards will be given in ...

It Is Never Too Late to Stop Smoking

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on October 12th, 2011 | No Comments »
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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently found that smoking rates among young adults have fallen more drastically than those of older adults. Dr. Bethea Kleykamp, a researcher at the National Institutes of Health, says the difference in quitting rates likely stems from older adults’ belief that the damage has already been done. However, Dr. Kleykamp believes this mind-set is not entirely valid, pointing to research that has found that even a month without ...