Prevent Cancer Foundation Blog

Cervical Cancer

HPV vaccine proving effective

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on June 28th, 2013 | No Comments »
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The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has decreased the incidence of the cancer-causing virus among teenage girls by 56 percent since the vaccine was approved in 2006. Despite these striking results, vaccination rates are still low in the U.S. Only one-third of teenage girls have received the full three-dose series of the HPV vaccine. Doctors aren't sure why the decline in HPV infections is so great, but believe it could be the result of herd immunity, in ...

HPV may trigger lung cancer: New study

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on May 21st, 2013 | No Comments »
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Human papillomavirus (HPV), a common virus known to cause cervical and head and neck cancers, may also trigger some cases of lung cancer, according to new preliminary research presented by Fox Chase Cancer Center. When examining tumor tissue samples from lung cancer patients who have never smoked, researchers found six percent of the samples showed signs of HPV infection. Researchers say further study is needed to understand the role HPV plays in some cases of ...

HPV Cancers a Concern for Both Men and Women

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on April 23rd, 2012 | No Comments »
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Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the leading cause of cervical cancer, but it also causes oral, anal and penile cancer. According to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) using data collected from 2004-2008, HPV causes 18,000 cancer cases in women and 8,000 cancer cases in men annually. HPV prevention has become a concern for both men and women. Receiving an HPV vaccine before becoming sexually active is the leading way to prevent ...

Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines…Do I Hear Consensus?

Posted by Lisa Hughes, Senior Director, Policy & Advocacy on April 4th, 2012 | No Comments »
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In recent years, when new screening guidelines have been announced by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), they are met with great debate and discussion. This is most often because the recommendations made by this government panel are not in agreement with the guidelines set by the American Cancer Society or other major medical organizations and professional societies. However, final guidelines recently published on cervical cancer screening by the USPSTF are being met with general ...