Prevent Cancer Foundation Blog

melanoma

Tanning bed lamps will now carry more warnings

Posted by Elizabeth Hoffler, Director of Policy and Advocacy on June 2nd, 2014 | No Comments »

FDA adds stricter warnings to tanning bed lamps The Prevent Cancer Foundation is pleased that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reclassified ultraviolet (UV) tanning lamps from class I (general controls) to class II (special controls) which will carry stricter regulations. Previously, tanning beds were regulated as “low-risk” devices. They will now carry a black box (which is the FDA’s strongest warning) that inform consumers of the risks of indoor tanning. These warnings will ...

Tanning Beds Directly Correlate to Skin Cancer

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on August 22nd, 2012 | No Comments »
avatar

A major European study by the International Prevention Research Institute in France recently found extremely high rates of melanoma in young users of indoor tanning beds. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and is strongly correlated with exposure to UV light. A number of studies conducted in northern European nations all concluded that increased UV exposure through indoor tanning beds is directly responsible for increased melanoma rates.  Researchers warned health officials of the dangers ...

Teens Banned from New York Tanning Beds

Posted by Prevent Cancer Foundation Staff on August 7th, 2012 | No Comments »
avatar

New York’s Governor Andrew M. Cuomo signed a law on July 16 prohibiting the use of indoor tanning beds by children ages 16 and younger. The law also requires 17 year olds to obtain parental consent before using indoor tanning beds. Indoor tanning beds increase the risk of developing skin cancer and expose skin to harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation that is far more intense than UV radiation from the sun. The melanoma rates for young women ...

As Melanoma Rates Increase, So Do Survival Rates

Posted by PCF Admin on April 10th, 2012 | No Comments »
pcf_logoforSM_040610_250px

According to an analysis spanning four decades in Minnesota, there is good news and bad news when it comes to skin cancer. From 1970 to 1979 and 2000 to 2009, the incidence of cutaneous melanoma increased but the death risk from melanoma decreased. Although that study may not reflect the entire country, other research from the CDC’s Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database confirms similar findings nationwide. Over the same time periods as the Minnesota analysis, ...