Prevent Cancer Foundation Blog

Prevention

Blog carnival: It begins with prevention

Posted by Beth Westbrook Starnes on October 23rd, 2013 | No Comments »
avatar

Katie was young and full of life. She was an outstanding athlete and gifted student. She wanted to grow up and attend law school. She had no idea that at age 12, she would have cancer. After my daughter, Katie, died of bone cancer at the age of 15, following a pathway for preventing cancer became a central focus in my life. Watching someone you love try so hard to live lead me to believe I ...

Blog carnival: Because I care

Posted by Dr. Robin B. Dilley on | No Comments »

I prevent cancer because I see the pain and fear it causes people I care about. I am a clinical psychologist who was diagnosed with cancer in 1999. Up until then, I had worked with several clients with cancer, never thinking that I would be on that side of the fence. I was 45. I had no family history. On the weekend that John F. Kennedy Jr.’s plane went down, I spent the day watching ...

Blog carnival: Prevention is a gift

Posted by Jan Bresch, Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer on | No Comments »
janbmahrer_150px

I'm delighted to be participating in the Prevent Cancer Foundation’s “blog carnival,” where people share their cancer stories, say why they stay healthy and who they prevent cancer for. Great idea – so here goes. First and foremost, I prevent cancer for me. I try to stay healthy by eating right, getting plenty of exercise, following screening guidelines and knowing my family’s medical history. I also prevent cancer for my son Jake. Too many times I’ve ...

Blog carnival: I prevent cancer for…you!

Posted by Jenny Twesten, Coordinator of Research and Programs on | No Comments »
Jenny Twesten

Cancer touches the lives of many families. How often do you hear someone share a story about a friend, a relative or an acquaintance that was recently diagnosed? Sadly, a lot. 1.6 million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer this year alone. In 2009, my dad was one of those statistics. At only 55 years old, my dad was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer. Over the next year and a half, I spent every ...