Prevent Cancer Foundation Blog

Testicular Cancer

Turning Grief into Action: A Father Talks about the Need for Greater Testicular Cancer Awareness

Posted by Jim Wood, Director, Digital Media on April 12th, 2012 | 4 Comments »
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[caption id="attachment_6938" align="alignright" width="202" caption="Brad Coleman"][/caption] Brad Coleman was a healthy and active 17 year-old boy who enjoyed fishing, hunting and riding ATVs in his native western Tennessee. In October 2008 he began complaining of severe headaches that were initially attributed to a family history of migraines. By the end of December, Brad’s headaches grew more severe and he was taken to the emergency room in nearby Camden, TN. There it was discovered that he had ...

Testicular Cancer Survivor’s Message: Guys, Check Yourself!

Posted by Jonny Imerman, Founder, Imerman Angels 1-on-1 Cancer Support on May 17th, 2011 | No Comments »

Like many young men, my testicular cancer diagnosis came out of thin air. I had no symptoms and thought I was a healthy, twenty-six-year old, juggling a job and working on my MBA when I suddenly had a pain in my left testicle that made me drop to my knees. It felt as if someone taken a dagger and shish kebabed me. At first, my doctor misdiagnosed it as an infection. But after a couple weeks ...

Cancer Early Detection A Winning Strategy for Olympic Athlete

Posted by Eric Shanteau on April 5th, 2011 | 2 Comments »
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I was diagnosed with testicular cancer on June 19, 2008. Due to my very fortunate early detection, I was able to go on two weeks later to fulfill my dream of making the US Olympic Swim Team. The detection of my cancer started one night while I was reading in bed. Just before turning the light out I thought I noticed something that shouldn’t be there. I went on to perform a self exam, to ...

Dr. Richard Wender: The Manly Thing to Do

Posted by Richard Wender, M.D. on June 1st, 2010 | No Comments »
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The strongest predictor of how long a new-born baby is destined to live is not whether they’re born in a city or in a rural area, their nationality, or the color of their skin.  It’s whether they are born male or female.  Men live about 5 fewer years than women. Are men just genetically predisposed to earlier and more death?  Or could a change in behavior result in mitigation of this risk? I refuse to accept ...